Multiple Sclerosis and the Newly Diagnosed
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Multiple Sclerosis and the Newly Diagnosed

I am sure if you have already looked around the web that you will be aware that nobody is really sure why some people get MS and others don’t or why more women than men are diagnosed. Or why diagnosis tends to be around the age of thirty-five.

  

 

 

 

Diagnosis

 

The fateful day when you finally get a diagnosis can leave your emotions in turmoil. 

 

Maybe you already suspected that you had MS. Maybe you have been battling already for years without a diagnosis being confirmed. So with this in mind it can come as quite a relief at first, you are not imaging your symptoms, they are real.

 

Or it may have come as a complete shock. Perhaps you ended up in hospital after suffering from a relapse (attack) maybe your first severe one and the others you just didn’t notice as you went along with your life.

 

Either way you will be wondering how you got MS and what you are going to do about it and how you are going to manage it.

 

First things first

 

I am sure if you have already looked around the web that you will be aware that nobody is really sure why some people get MS and others don’t or why more women than men are diagnosed. Or why diagnosis tends to be around the age of thirty-five.

 

As it stands at the moment there are no miracle cures and no drugs that can mend the damage already done by your over active immune system but there are things that can give you some relief form the symptoms.

 

Talking it over

 

Take some time for yourself so you can think about what you have been told. Write down any concerning questions you may have and ask your Neurologist or MS nurse if you have one.

 

Depending on what type of MS you have been diagnosed with will depend on the best way to treat your symptoms.

 

Many people with MS are still able to work, although swapping to flexi hours if your work place permits is a good idea or cutting back your hours.

 

Listen to your body

 

You will probably have been pushing what your body has been telling you to the back of your mind but now is the time to change. If you are tired, rest. If you can’t manage to go out for a friends Birthday don’t worry about it, explain the situation. Try not to take on things that are stressful and leave you exhausted.

 

Don’t be afraid to ask people for help, you may suffer weakness or lose the sensation in a hand, fingers or leg. These disabilities could just be short term and once the myelin inflammation has settled they may improve or even get back to how they were before the attack.

 

This is a long-term disease, so find ways to cope. Be positive and don’t give up doing the things you love doing, you may have to do things slower or with the help of others but you can still find a way to do them.

 

Find ways to relax

 

Finding ways to wipe out stress and tension can be difficult. You may suffer from temperature change, so those long hot soaks in the bath may be out of the question.

 

Massage or reflexology are two fantastic ways to release pressure from stiff muscles and tense feet, reflexology goes along way to helping your over all health and they both rid your body of toxins.

 

Yoga is another way of keeping the muscles in your body pliable, this all helps with stiffness and joint pain that are very common in people with MS.

 

If you think you may be suffering with depression, go to your doctor, don’t let it take over your mind or the situation you are in will seem even worse.

 

Once your body is more relaxed so can your mind be. Only then can you do what you are supposed to do… Live your life, not MS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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